Art book of Beauties
Publish date2016-09-23
Ikenaga Yasunari
Born in 1965 in Oita prefecture and graduated from the Midorigaoka High School (attached to the Oita Prefectural College of Arts and Culture). Painted on his own dyed linen canvas, his "bijinga (Portraits/ prints of beautiful women)" provide a sophisticated texture and taste. His first art book in 2014 is a long-seller and his works are also published as prints, calendars and coloring books. Even in foreign countries, his works are popular as design of stationeries and novels.
Okamoto Toko

Born in Kyoto and earned a MFA degree in Japanese Style Painting from the Tokyo University of the Arts, Okamoto Toko is a Japanese painter who looks straight at the essence of what she is painting, especially the delicacy of women depicted with refinement as if you could feel the temperature, humidity and the air rising from the surface of the work, a mysterious world created by her great artistic senses. It is hard not to be captivated by her intense and amazing works.
Nakahara Arisa
Arisa Nakahara was born in Okinawa and completed a master degree in Japanese Style Painting from the Tokyo University of the Arts.
Most of her works are portraits of women with vivid color contrast combining boldness and delicacy which have certain loveliness. “No matter where the starting point is, if she has the strength to live, she will definitely shine!” Nakahara said. The artist will be continuously creating the ”long-lasting sparkles” through the works.
Otake Ayana
Born in Saitama prefecture in 1981. Graduated from the Tokyo University of the Arts, PhD. in Japanese Paintings
Conspicuous trait of Japanese painting is to depict the object with subtle lines.
Today, Otake Ayana may be second to none who has full command at using the brush to draw the subtle line.
With much scruple yet much ease she deftly manipulate this line to depict the voluptuous grace of the beauty.
The most suitable way of depicting the womanliness lies in the subtle line of the technique of Japanese painting. Her works demonstrate clearly this fact and are still going to develop for aging.
Taguchi Yuka
Decades of years have passed since "the downfall theory of Japanese painting" was developed. Is there a future in Japanese style paintings with mineral pigment and hide glue? Against that argument, she obediently draws, with respect for the paintings from Edo to Meiji and with reverence for women.
She, as a contemporary artist, is asking herself what she can do for this problem, and keeps challenging everyday to depict people and creatures with enthusiasm.